The price advisory grade can be best explained with an example. We are going to compare two offered bottles with eachother (see image below).  

  1. Macallan, distillerd in 1990, 18 year old and a alcohol percentage of 43%. 
  2. Macallan, distillerd in 1988, 24 year old and a alcohol percentage of 52,4%.

Screenshot of bottles that are offered on the World Whisky Index


Both bottles are offered for the same price, €1.000,-. The price advisory grade can guide you to compare the asking price of these two bottles. The lower the price advisory grade, the more attractive the bottle is.


In this example the first bottle has a price advisory grade of 31,0 and the second bottle 23,8. Conclusion: the second bottle is the more attractive offer. In this case, when the asking price is equal, it can makes sense. The second bottle is distilled two years earlier, has matured longer and has a higher alcoholpercentage.


But in below example it becomes more complicated. And then the price advisory grade can be helpful.


The price advisory grade takes the following factors into account:

  • lowest asking price
  • vintage (year of distillation) 
  • age 
  • alcohol percentage


When the price advisory grade is 0 ('zero'), it means that there is no sufficient data of the bottle to calculate the price advisory grade. In the first example you see three Macallan's where the vintage and age is not known. Therefore the price advisory grade is 0.